image of drug overdose

CDC Reports New Annual Drug Overdose Death Record

Using Preliminary 2019 Data, The CDC Reports New Annual Drug Overdose Death Records.

man addicted to drug calling for helpAfter declining in 2018, drug overdose deaths in the U.S. hit a new record as almost 71,000 Americans died, with fentanyl and synthetic opioids responsible for roughly half of all overdose deaths, according to preliminary data released by the Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention (CDC). In 2018, the CDC reported that there were 67,367 drug overdose deaths, a 4.1 percent decline over the previous record 70,237 overdose deaths reported in 2017. Almost 850,000 Americans have died of drug overdoses since 1999, making it one of the leading causes of injury related deaths, according to the CDC.

The lower 2018 numbers represented the first decline in U.S. drug overdose deaths in three decades and policymakers had hoped the decline marked a turn-around or plateau in annual drug-related deaths. Any such hope has since faced as there are fears among policymakers and addiction experts that the COVID-19 pandemic will boost all forms of substance abuse, which in turn will lead to even more deaths and another overdose death record. While opioids were the biggest killer among all drug classes in 2019, overdose deaths due to cocaine and methamphetamine are also on the rise.

The CDC’s preliminary numbers weren’t all bad. Seventeen states reported overdose death declines, including West Virginia and Missouri, both of which are considered hot spots for opioid addiction. West Virginia’s 4.0 percent decline and Missouri’s 2.0 percent decline may seem modest compared to declines seen in Vermont (-18.1%) and Arkansas (-16.2%), however, those states are dealing with far fewer overdose death numbers on a relative basis. New York, which reported a 10.1 percent decline, also reported the biggest numerical decline with 226 fewer overdose deaths in 2019 than the 2,236 recorded in 2018. Michigan, with an 8.4 percent decline, reported the second largest numerical decline, with -217. Other states reporting declines included Georgia, Alabama, Oklahoma, Nevada, Utah, North Carolina, Maryland, New Jersey, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island.

South Dakota recorded the biggest percentage gain in deaths, with a 54.4 percent year-over-year increase, but this was based on a relatively low 31 death increase over the 51 recorded in 2018. California experienced the biggest numerical increase, with 6,351 drug overdose deaths adding 851 more deaths in 2019 than the 5,494 recorded in 2018, an increase of 15.5 percent. Florida came in second on a numerical basis with 590 more deaths, an increase of 12.0 percent.

While the pandemic is likely to create more demand for drugs, the states with overdose death declines provide some hope to addiction experts. Johns Hopkins School of Health addiction researcher, Brendan Saloner, suggested that the states reporting overdose death declines have shown a commitment to preventing overdoses among active drug users and in helping people get treatment when needed. U.S. Assistant Secretary for Health Admiral Brett Giroir acknowledged that the recent data makes it clear that the government needs to do more to hold the line, especially when considering potential exacerbation of the problem due to COVID-19.

If you or someone you care about, has an ongoing history of trauma-related alcohol or substance use and/or relapse, contact Gulf Breeze Recovery or call: (855) 433-4480 to speak to an addiction expert to learn more about their residential program, out-patient program, and intensive out-patient program, and which of these can best fit your individual needs.  These programs have helped many people overcome their addiction and embrace a new happy, healthy, substance-free lifestyle.

We help people not just to survive, but to THRIVE!

Using Preliminary 2019 Data, The CDC Reports New Annual Drug Overdose Death Records.

man addicted to drug calling for helpAfter declining in 2018, drug overdose deaths in the U.S. hit a new record as almost 71,000 Americans died, with fentanyl and synthetic opioids responsible for roughly half of all overdose deaths, according to preliminary data released by the Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention (CDC). In 2018, the CDC reported that there were 67,367 drug overdose deaths, a 4.1 percent decline over the previous record 70,237 overdose deaths reported in 2017. Almost 850,000 Americans have died of drug overdoses since 1999, making it one of the leading causes of injury related deaths, according to the CDC.

The lower 2018 numbers represented the first decline in U.S. drug overdose deaths in three decades and policymakers had hoped the decline marked a turn-around or plateau in annual drug-related deaths. Any such hope has since faced as there are fears among policymakers and addiction experts that the COVID-19 pandemic will boost all forms of substance abuse, which in turn will lead to even more deaths and another overdose death record. While opioids were the biggest killer among all drug classes in 2019, overdose deaths due to cocaine and methamphetamine are also on the rise.

The CDC’s preliminary numbers weren’t all bad. Seventeen states reported overdose death declines, including West Virginia and Missouri, both of which are considered hot spots for opioid addiction. West Virginia’s 4.0 percent decline and Missouri’s 2.0 percent decline may seem modest compared to declines seen in Vermont (-18.1%) and Arkansas (-16.2%), however, those states are dealing with far fewer overdose death numbers on a relative basis. New York, which reported a 10.1 percent decline, also reported the biggest numerical decline with 226 fewer overdose deaths in 2019 than the 2,236 recorded in 2018. Michigan, with an 8.4 percent decline, reported the second largest numerical decline, with -217. Other states reporting declines included Georgia, Alabama, Oklahoma, Nevada, Utah, North Carolina, Maryland, New Jersey, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island.

South Dakota recorded the biggest percentage gain in deaths, with a 54.4 percent year-over-year increase, but this was based on a relatively low 31 death increase over the 51 recorded in 2018. California experienced the biggest numerical increase, with 6,351 drug overdose deaths adding 851 more deaths in 2019 than the 5,494 recorded in 2018, an increase of 15.5 percent. Florida came in second on a numerical basis with 590 more deaths, an increase of 12.0 percent.

While the pandemic is likely to create more demand for drugs, the states with overdose death declines provide some hope to addiction experts. Johns Hopkins School of Health addiction researcher, Brendan Saloner, suggested that the states reporting overdose death declines have shown a commitment to preventing overdoses among active drug users and in helping people get treatment when needed. U.S. Assistant Secretary for Health Admiral Brett Giroir acknowledged that the recent data makes it clear that the government needs to do more to hold the line, especially when considering potential exacerbation of the problem due to COVID-19.

If you or someone you care about, has an ongoing history of trauma-related alcohol or substance use and/or relapse, contact Gulf Breeze Recovery or call: (855) 433-4480 to speak to an addiction expert to learn more about their residential program, out-patient program, and intensive out-patient program, and which of these can best fit your individual needs.  These programs have helped many people overcome their addiction and embrace a new happy, healthy, substance-free lifestyle.

We help people not just to survive, but to THRIVE!

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About Gulf Breeze Recovery:

Gulf Breeze Recovery, unlike other treatment centers in Florida, is a non 12 step holistic drug and alcohol rehab that is changing the future of addiction treatment with their THRIVE® (Total Health Recovery) program focused on overcoming chronic relapse.
Gulf Breeze Recovery’s THRIVE® program is a non 12-step approach designed for those who are looking for a drug and alcohol treatment program to produce a different and positive result.
This non-12 step program allows you to drive beyond your addictions and promotes a new outlook on life.
We are licensed by the Florida Department of Children and Families, and our last audit scored 99.7! Also, we are gold certified by the Joint Commission.

Program logo: Gulf Breeze Recovery offers a true non-12-Step, holistic drug treatment program with licensed mental health professionals who have small caseloads so that they can offer individualized and intensive care and it's called THRIVE®

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Sources:

National Center for Health Statistics. “Vital Statistics Rapid Release: Provisional Drug Overdose Death Count.” July 15, 2020. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Jackson, Carla K. “New peak of 71K US overdose deaths in 2019 dashes hopes.” July 15, 2020. Associated Press.

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