woman in shutdown reading about COVID-19

The U.N. Calls for Heightened Attention to Addiction Treatment in Response to COVID-19

COVID-19 Worsening of Illicit Drug Use Problem.

files of drugs labeled COVID-19The world’s illicit drug usage problem continues to worsen and the global COVID-19 pandemic could serve to compound the problem in myriad ways, according to the latest U.N. “World Drug Report,” released late last month. According to the report, almost 270 million people worldwide used drugs in 2018, a 30 percent increase from 2009. Of these users, an estimated 35.6 million suffer from drug use disorders and only one out of eight people in need of drug-related treatment receive it. Additionally, while one out of every three drug users are female, only one out of every five people in treatment are female, suggesting that women are under served by global addiction treatment services.

While COVID-19-related lockdowns and economic disruptions are likely to upset global illegal drug markets, the pandemic will also likely force governments to reduce drug-related budgets. This includes everything from enforcement at the local level to multi-government efforts to stem international trafficking. It could also include government support for addiction treatment and educational campaigns. Such budget reductions are expected to be global in scope, but likely be most noticeable in poorer countries.

The impact of COVID-19 has increased the need for intervention and drug and alcohol addiction treatment.

man passed out from alcohol at home under COVID-19 quarantine or lockdownAccording to the report, COVID-19’s impact on the delivery of drug addiction services varies by country. While some countries have tried to increase services to addicts and reduced barriers for obtaining opiate-substitution medications, other countries report that they have been “having difficulties in maintaining services for drug users.”

Overall, the U.N. believes the economic downturn caused by COVID-19 has the significant potential to “worsen levels of drug production, trafficking and use.” In response, the U.N. believes governments should focus their energies in large part on evidence-based drug use prevention, evidence-based drug addiction treatment, and on delivering services aimed at reducing associated harm in areas affected by drug use and addiction. In fact, the U.N. asserts that there is “overwhelming evidence” that evidence-based treatments for drug use disorders comes at a cheaper cost than the damages caused by leaving drug dependence untreated. Scientific evidence-based treatment of drug use disorders not only helps reduce drug-related harm but also improves the health, well-being and recovery of people with drug use disorders while at the same time reducing drug-related crime and increasing public safety and positive community outcomes. Along with boosting evidence-based treatment, the U.N. notes that the “stigma associated with drug use and drug use disorders needs to be addressed by promoting the understanding that the initiation of drug use and the development of drug use disorders are influenced by factors that are often beyond the control of an individual.”

COVID-19 Worsening of Illicit Drug Use Problem.

files of drugs labeled COVID-19The world’s illicit drug usage problem continues to worsen and the global COVID-19 pandemic could serve to compound the problem in myriad ways, according to the latest U.N. “World Drug Report,” released late last month. According to the report, almost 270 million people worldwide used drugs in 2018, a 30 percent increase from 2009. Of these users, an estimated 35.6 million suffer from drug use disorders and only one out of eight people in need of drug-related treatment receive it. Additionally, while one out of every three drug users are female, only one out of every five people in treatment are female, suggesting that women are under served by global addiction treatment services.

While COVID-19-related lockdowns and economic disruptions are likely to upset global illegal drug markets, the pandemic will also likely force governments to reduce drug-related budgets. This includes everything from enforcement at the local level to multi-government efforts to stem international trafficking. It could also include government support for addiction treatment and educational campaigns. Such budget reductions are expected to be global in scope, but likely be most noticeable in poorer countries.

The impact of COVID-19 has increased the need for intervention and drug and alcohol addiction treatment.

man passed out from alcohol at home under COVID-19 quarantine or lockdownAccording to the report, COVID-19’s impact on the delivery of drug addiction services varies by country. While some countries have tried to increase services to addicts and reduced barriers for obtaining opiate-substitution medications, other countries report that they have been “having difficulties in maintaining services for drug users.”

Overall, the U.N. believes the economic downturn caused by COVID-19 has the significant potential to “worsen levels of drug production, trafficking and use.” In response, the U.N. believes governments should focus their energies in large part on evidence-based drug use prevention, evidence-based drug addiction treatment, and on delivering services aimed at reducing associated harm in areas affected by drug use and addiction. In fact, the U.N. asserts that there is “overwhelming evidence” that evidence-based treatments for drug use disorders comes at a cheaper cost than the damages caused by leaving drug dependence untreated. Scientific evidence-based treatment of drug use disorders not only helps reduce drug-related harm but also improves the health, well-being and recovery of people with drug use disorders while at the same time reducing drug-related crime and increasing public safety and positive community outcomes. Along with boosting evidence-based treatment, the U.N. notes that the “stigma associated with drug use and drug use disorders needs to be addressed by promoting the understanding that the initiation of drug use and the development of drug use disorders are influenced by factors that are often beyond the control of an individual.”

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About Gulf Breeze Recovery:

Gulf Breeze Recovery, unlike other treatment centers in Florida, is a non 12 step holistic drug and alcohol rehab that is changing the future of addiction treatment with their THRIVE® (Total Health Recovery) program focused on overcoming chronic relapse.
Gulf Breeze Recovery’s THRIVE® program is a non 12-step approach designed for those who are looking for a drug and alcohol treatment program to produce a different and positive result.
This non-12 step program allows you to drive beyond your addictions and promotes a new outlook on life.
We are licensed by the Florida Department of Children and Families, and our last audit scored 99.7! Also, we are gold certified by the Joint Commission.

Program logo: Gulf Breeze Recovery offers a true non-12-Step, holistic drug treatment program with licensed mental health professionals who have small caseloads so that they can offer individualized and intensive care and it's called THRIVE®

End Chronic Relapse and Start a New Life!

At Gulf Breeze Recovery we don’t want you to have just a great recovery, we want you to have a great life!

Contact Us, or Call: (855) 433-4480

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