image of woman in therapy for ptsd and alcoholism

The Dangerous Duo of PTSD and Alcoholism

People with PTSD often develop co-occurring disorders such as alcohol and substance abuse.

image of man facing cameraVariations of the term and definitions of post-traumatic stress disorder have existed for decades.

One of the earliest modern descriptions came from a Vietnam veteran study, with previous terms including shell shock and battle fatigue. Although exposure to combat or other war conditions has a well-established link to what we now call PTSD, in recent years there has been an increased focus on civilian sufferers and the root causes of their conditions, as well.

As a mental health issue, PTSD is not confined to service-members and veterans. It can affect any person who has gone through a significant and terrible life event. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, “anyone can develop PTSD at any age.” Common incidents that can lead to symptoms, aside from combat, include “physical or sexual assault, abuse, accident, disaster, or other serious events.”

Nearly 8 in 100 persons can expect to survive a PTSD-inducing event.

Research suggests that genetics play a role in making some people more susceptible than others and that women may be more prone than men to experience symptoms. The latter fact, however, could be more attributed to higher risks of trauma. Veterans Affairs states that “five out of ten women experience a traumatic event” but notes that females go through different types of trauma than males might experience.

One thing people with PTSD often have in common is they can all develop co-occurring disorders. As the name suggests, this refers to two simultaneous conditions, with one related to alcohol or substance abuse. Not every person with a mental health condition will develop a co-occurring disorder, but some conditions are more prone than others to feature symptoms that increase risk. PTSD is one of those conditions.

80% of PTSD sufferers receive at least one other diagnosis, and up to 46.4% will meet the criteria for a Substance Abuse Disorder such as alcoholism. An older study (the National Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Study) found an alarming 74% rate of co-occurring PTSD and substance abuse within veterans of that war.

Alcohol, being legal and easily attainable, has become the “go-to” drug of choice.

pile of beer bottle caps for Gulf Breeze Recovery's non-12 step rehab in florida blog article entitled "The 3 "A's" of Reducing Alcohol Abuse—And Why American’s Won't Implement Them"As a drug, alcohol, which contains the psychoactive chemical compound ethanol, is one of the world’s oldest and most popular recreational substances.

Alcoholism or Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) has become a lethal epidemic in America. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism describes AUD as a “chronic relapsing brain disorder characterized by an impaired ability to stop or control alcohol use despite adverse social, occupational, or health consequences.” Compare that to PTSD symptoms, which can fall into categories such as avoidance, arousal, and mood symptoms. Common symptoms include frightening thoughts, tension, stress, anger, negative thoughts, and loss of interest in things.

All those symptoms are prime candidates to entice many people to turn to alcohol. Again and again, PTSD sufferers are seen to seek solace in drinking, often to the point of addiction and abuse. However, since the symptoms don’t disappear without proper treatment, those users will continue drinking, making many symptoms such as anxiety, restlessness, and depression even worse than before. That is why the VA and other organizations suggest treating both conditions together to achieve optimal outcomes.

If you or someone you care about, has an ongoing history of alcohol or substance use and/or relapse, contact Gulf Breeze Recovery or call: (855) 433-4480 to speak to an addiction expert to learn more about their residential program, out-patient program, and intensive out-patient program, and which of these can best fit your individual needs.  These programs have helped many people overcome their addiction and embrace their new happy, healthy, substance-free lifestyle.

We help people not just to survive, but to THRIVE!

People with PTSD often develop co-occurring disorders such as alcohol and substance abuse.

image of man facing cameraVariations of the term and definitions of post-traumatic stress disorder have existed for decades.

One of the earliest modern descriptions came from a Vietnam veteran study, with previous terms including shell shock and battle fatigue. Although exposure to combat or other war conditions has a well-established link to what we now call PTSD, in recent years there has been an increased focus on civilian sufferers and the root causes of their conditions, as well.

As a mental health issue, PTSD is not confined to service-members and veterans. It can affect any person who has gone through a significant and terrible life event. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, “anyone can develop PTSD at any age.” Common incidents that can lead to symptoms, aside from combat, include “physical or sexual assault, abuse, accident, disaster, or other serious events.”

Nearly 8 in 100 persons can expect to survive a PTSD-inducing event.

Research suggests that genetics play a role in making some people more susceptible than others and that women may be more prone than men to experience symptoms. The latter fact, however, could be more attributed to higher risks of trauma. Veterans Affairs states that “five out of ten women experience a traumatic event” but notes that females go through different types of trauma than males might experience.

One thing people with PTSD often have in common is they can all develop co-occurring disorders. As the name suggests, this refers to two simultaneous conditions, with one related to alcohol or substance abuse. Not every person with a mental health condition will develop a co-occurring disorder, but some conditions are more prone than others to feature symptoms that increase risk. PTSD is one of those conditions.

80% of PTSD sufferers receive at least one other diagnosis, and up to 46.4% will meet the criteria for a Substance Abuse Disorder such as alcoholism. An older study (the National Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Study) found an alarming 74% rate of co-occurring PTSD and substance abuse within veterans of that war.

Alcohol, being legal and easily attainable, has become the “go-to” drug of choice.

pile of beer bottle caps for Gulf Breeze Recovery's non-12 step rehab in florida blog article entitled "The 3 "A's" of Reducing Alcohol Abuse—And Why American’s Won't Implement Them"As a drug, alcohol, which contains the psychoactive chemical compound ethanol, is one of the world’s oldest and most popular recreational substances.

Alcoholism or Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) has become a lethal epidemic in America. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism describes AUD as a “chronic relapsing brain disorder characterized by an impaired ability to stop or control alcohol use despite adverse social, occupational, or health consequences.” Compare that to PTSD symptoms, which can fall into categories such as avoidance, arousal, and mood symptoms. Common symptoms include frightening thoughts, tension, stress, anger, negative thoughts, and loss of interest in things.

All those symptoms are prime candidates to entice many people to turn to alcohol. Again and again, PTSD sufferers are seen to seek solace in drinking, often to the point of addiction and abuse. However, since the symptoms don’t disappear without proper treatment, those users will continue drinking, making many symptoms such as anxiety, restlessness, and depression even worse than before. That is why the VA and other organizations suggest treating both conditions together to achieve optimal outcomes.

If you or someone you care about, has an ongoing history of alcohol or substance use and/or relapse, contact Gulf Breeze Recovery or call: (855) 433-4480 to speak to an addiction expert to learn more about their residential program, out-patient program, and intensive out-patient program, and which of these can best fit your individual needs.  These programs have helped many people overcome their addiction and embrace their new happy, healthy, substance-free lifestyle.

We help people not just to survive, but to THRIVE!

The front of Gulf Breeze Recovery a non 12 step holistic drug and alcohol rehab specializing in helping guests overcome chronic relapse

About Gulf Breeze Recovery:

Gulf Breeze Recovery, unlike other treatment centers in Florida, is a non 12 step holistic drug and alcohol rehab that is changing the future of addiction treatment with their THRIVE® (Total Health Recovery) program focused on overcoming chronic relapse.
Gulf Breeze Recovery’s THRIVE® program is a non 12-step approach designed for those who are looking for a drug and alcohol treatment program to produce a different and positive result.
This non-12 step program allows you to drive beyond your addictions and promotes a new outlook on life.
We are licensed by the Florida Department of Children and Families, and our last audit scored 99.7! Also, we are gold certified by the Joint Commission.

Program logo: Gulf Breeze Recovery offers a true non-12-Step, holistic drug treatment program with licensed mental health professionals who have small caseloads so that they can offer individualized and intensive care and it's called THRIVE®

End Chronic Relapse and Start a New Life!

At Gulf Breeze Recovery we don’t want you to have just a great recovery, we want you to have a great life!

Contact Us, or Call: (855) 433-4480

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