image of young people drinking alcohol and one abstaining

American Youth “Just Say No”… to Alcohol

The Youth of America are Starting to “Just Say No”... to Alcohol, at Least.

image of beer bottle capsWhile few young Americans probably know that former First Lady Nancy Reagan coined the “Just Say No” slogan used to encourage youth to refrain from engaging in illegal recreational drug use, some may be taking the slogan to heart. Well, kind of. Rather than illegal drugs, though, young Americans appear to be saying no to alcohol in ever greater numbers. According to a study that surveyed more than 180,000 young adults in 2018, the number of college students between the ages of 18 and 22 who abstained from drinking increased to 28 percent compared to their peers who only abstained at a rate of 20 percent in 2002. Non-college students reported a similar increase in abstinence with a current 30 percent rate, compared to 24 percent who abstained in 2002. The report also determined that the rate of alcohol abuse in both groups was roughly half of what it was in 2002.

Young Americans, however, aren’t starting to “just say no” to marijuana

image of marijuana joint for "Just Say No" to alcohol article

image of happy young womanResearchers at the Center for the Study of Drugs, Alcohol, Smoking and Health at the University of Michigan School of Nursing were surprised by the study’s findings. “We’re encouraged by the significant decreases in alcohol-use disorder—for both college and noncollege students,” said lead researcher Dr. Sean Esteban McCabe, director of the center. “The prevalence of alcohol-use disorder in both groups in 2018 was roughly half of what it was in 2002. We are excited to learn about these drops in disordered drinking, as alcohol-related consequences are one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity for young adults.”

That all said, the study also found that young Americans aren’t starting to “just say no” to marijuana, as more reported using the drug than in 2002. Co-use of marijuana and alcohol also increased compared to 2002, and 75 percent of those who reported co-use, or met criteria for alcohol-use disorder and/or marijuana-use disorder, also abused prescription and recreational drugs.

Study co-researcher Dr. Ty Schepis said that while there’s a “lot of hope in our study’s results,” the increases in marijuana-use disorder and co-use of alcohol and marijuana is concerning. These issues need more attention from a substance abuse perspective, he said, because “we know that polysubstance use can have more negative consequences and be more difficult to treat.”

In conclusion, the report said that U.S. colleges and communities need to maintain and create “supportive resources for young adults as the substance use landscape changes.

Such resources should continue encouraging the alcohol abstinence while also putting more intervention focus that takes a “more holistic polysubstance use perspective.” Dr. McCabe added that “interventions that focus solely on one substance will be less effective than interventions that take a more holistic polysubstance use perspective.” Study findings “reinforce the complex task health professionals have of detecting and developing effective interventions” for treatment purposes, he said.

The report—“Assessment of Changes in Alcohol and Marijuana Abstinence, Co-Use, and Use Disorders Among US Young Adults From 2002 to 2018”—can be accessed at Jama Pediatrics.

image of gulf breeze recovery's private beach and pool area. Leaders in non-12 step holistic drug and alcohol treatment

If you or someone you care about, has an ongoing history of alcohol or substance use and/or relapse, contact Gulf Breeze Recovery or call: (855) 433-4480 to speak to an addiction expert to learn more about their residential program, out-patient program, and intensive out-patient program, and which of these can best fit your individual needs.  These programs have helped many people overcome their addiction and embrace their new happy, healthy, substance-free lifestyle.

We help people not just to survive, but to THRIVE!

The Youth of America are Starting to “Just Say No”... to Alcohol, at Least.

image of beer bottle capsWhile few young Americans probably know that former First Lady Nancy Reagan coined the “Just Say No” slogan used to encourage youth to refrain from engaging in illegal recreational drug use, some may be taking the slogan to heart. Well, kind of. Rather than illegal drugs, though, young Americans appear to be saying no to alcohol in ever greater numbers. According to a study that surveyed more than 180,000 young adults in 2018, the number of college students between the ages of 18 and 22 who abstained from drinking increased to 28 percent compared to their peers who only abstained at a rate of 20 percent in 2002. Non-college students reported a similar increase in abstinence with a current 30 percent rate, compared to 24 percent who abstained in 2002. The report also determined that the rate of alcohol abuse in both groups was roughly half of what it was in 2002.

Young Americans, however, aren’t starting to “just say no” to marijuana

image of marijuana joint for "Just Say No" to alcohol article

image of happy young womanResearchers at the Center for the Study of Drugs, Alcohol, Smoking and Health at the University of Michigan School of Nursing were surprised by the study’s findings. “We’re encouraged by the significant decreases in alcohol-use disorder—for both college and noncollege students,” said lead researcher Dr. Sean Esteban McCabe, director of the center. “The prevalence of alcohol-use disorder in both groups in 2018 was roughly half of what it was in 2002. We are excited to learn about these drops in disordered drinking, as alcohol-related consequences are one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity for young adults.”

That all said, the study also found that young Americans aren’t starting to “just say no” to marijuana, as more reported using the drug than in 2002. Co-use of marijuana and alcohol also increased compared to 2002, and 75 percent of those who reported co-use, or met criteria for alcohol-use disorder and/or marijuana-use disorder, also abused prescription and recreational drugs.

Study co-researcher Dr. Ty Schepis said that while there’s a “lot of hope in our study’s results,” the increases in marijuana-use disorder and co-use of alcohol and marijuana is concerning. These issues need more attention from a substance abuse perspective, he said, because “we know that polysubstance use can have more negative consequences and be more difficult to treat.”

In conclusion, the report said that U.S. colleges and communities need to maintain and create “supportive resources for young adults as the substance use landscape changes.

Such resources should continue encouraging the alcohol abstinence while also putting more intervention focus that takes a “more holistic polysubstance use perspective.” Dr. McCabe added that “interventions that focus solely on one substance will be less effective than interventions that take a more holistic polysubstance use perspective.” Study findings “reinforce the complex task health professionals have of detecting and developing effective interventions” for treatment purposes, he said.

The report—“Assessment of Changes in Alcohol and Marijuana Abstinence, Co-Use, and Use Disorders Among US Young Adults From 2002 to 2018”—can be accessed at Jama Pediatrics.

image of gulf breeze recovery's private beach and pool area. Leaders in non-12 step holistic drug and alcohol treatment

If you or someone you care about, has an ongoing history of alcohol or substance use and/or relapse, contact Gulf Breeze Recovery or call: (855) 433-4480 to speak to an addiction expert to learn more about their residential program, out-patient program, and intensive out-patient program, and which of these can best fit your individual needs.  These programs have helped many people overcome their addiction and embrace their new happy, healthy, substance-free lifestyle.

We help people not just to survive, but to THRIVE!

The front of Gulf Breeze Recovery a non 12 step holistic drug and alcohol rehab specializing in helping guests overcome chronic relapse

About Gulf Breeze Recovery:

Gulf Breeze Recovery, unlike other treatment centers in Florida, is a non 12 step holistic drug and alcohol rehab that is changing the future of addiction treatment with their THRIVE® (Total Health Recovery) program focused on overcoming chronic relapse.
Gulf Breeze Recovery’s THRIVE® program is a non 12-step approach designed for those who are looking for a drug and alcohol treatment program to produce a different and positive result.
This non-12 step program allows you to drive beyond your addictions and promotes a new outlook on life.
We are licensed by the Florida Department of Children and Families, and our last audit scored 99.7! Also, we are gold certified by the Joint Commission.

Program logo: Gulf Breeze Recovery offers a true non-12-Step, holistic drug treatment program with licensed mental health professionals who have small caseloads so that they can offer individualized and intensive care and it's called THRIVE®

End Chronic Relapse and Start a New Life!

At Gulf Breeze Recovery we don’t want you to have just a great recovery, we want you to have a great life!

Contact Us, or Call: (855) 433-4480

Sources:

University of Michigan. “More young adults are abstaining from alcohol.” Oct. 12, 2020. Science News. Retrieved at: www.sciencedaily.com/releases

Reinberg, Steven. “More Young Adults in the U.S. Are Saying No to Alcohol.” Oct. 13, 2020. U.S. News and World Report. Retrieved at: www.usnews.com/news/health-news

McCabe, Sean Esteban, PhD; Arterberry, Brooke J., PhD; Dickenson, Kara, et al. “Assessment of Changes in Alcohol and Marijuana Abstinence, Co-Use, and Use Disorders Among US Young Adults From 2002 to 2018.” Oct. 12, 2020. JAMA Pediatrics. Retrieved at: www.jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics

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